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Still time to grab fresh peaches from the growers. This recipe has a trick, is easy…and so good!

 

Peach Cobbler 

RENEE ERICKSON A BOAT, A WHALE & A WALRUS

Original Boat Street Café owner Susan Kaplan handed this recipe down to me when I took the reins, and although it’s changed over the years, it’s still a favorite.

The method is a bit unusual: I dress unpeeled juicy peaches with lemon zest, then smear the batter on top, followed by a dousing of sugar and a bit of hot water. The result is a delicate crackly crust unrivaled in the world of cobblers. Use the same crust to top summer berries, if you prefer.

YIELD

8 servings

ACTIVE TIME

30 minutes

TOTAL TIME

1 hour 40 Minutes

INGREDIENTS

    • 10 large peaches (about 4½ pounds), unpeeled, cut into 1-inch chunks
    • Zest and juice of 1 large lemon
    • ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
    • 2 cups sugar, divided
    • 1½ cups (about 192 grams) all-purpose flour
    • 2 teaspoons baking powder
    • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
    • ¾ cup whole milk
    • ½ cup hot tap water
    • Heavy cream, for serving

 

PREPARATION

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
    1. Put the peaches in a 9-by-13-inch (or similar) baking pan or gratin dish. Pat the peaches into a roughly even layer, then, using a zester or a Microplane, zest the lemon evenly over the fruit and squeeze the lemon juice evenly over the top.
    2. In the work bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and 1½ cups of the sugar on medium speed until sandy, about 1 minute. Add the flour, baking powder, and salt, and beat again for another 30 seconds, until all the flour is incorporated and the mixture is evenly crumbly. With the mixer on low speed, slowly add in the milk. Increase the speed to medium and beat until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes.
    3. Plop the batter in 6 large blobs over the top of the peaches. With an offset spatula or small knife, carefully spread the batter evenly over the fruit, so it’s no more than about ½ inch thick in any one place.
    4. Sprinkle the remaining ½ cup sugar directly over the batter. Drizzle the hot water evenly over the sugar, using it to melt the sugar into the topping. (Use it all. It’s a strange method, but it works.)
    5. Bake the cobbler for 70 to 80 minutes, or until the top is browned and cracked. (A toothpick inserted into the topping should come out dry—be sure to check in a few places.)
    6. Let the cobbler sit for about a half an hour to firm up before serving warm in big bowls, with heavy cream poured on top.